Social media has revolutionized the way we live, but how can we leverage it for learning?

GESS_2015_1I had an opportunity to explore this during a presentation I delivered on Tuesday, February 24, 2015 at the 2105 GESS Global Education Forum in Dubai, United Arab Emirates. Sharing seven strategies for curating and creating curriculum I promoted best practices and case studies you can use to prepare your pedagogy, socially.

There is both uncertainty and opportunity with regard to using social media to power your pedagogy. Consider that, in 2013, 59.2% of nearly 8,000 higher education participants in a Babson Survey Research Group and Pearson survey agreed “the interactive nature of online and mobile technologies can create better learning environments.”

Additionally, 41% currently use social media in their classrooms. However, 56% of that same population are concerned that online and mobile technologies are “more distracting than helpful to students.”

As an educator you have an array of options from which to choose: blogs, Facebook, Google, Instagram, Twitter, Tumblr, LinkedIn, Pinterest, YouTube, and more. Each of these interactive options can enhance engagement and increase interaction in your classes. But having a tool and knowing how to use it are different experiences altogether.

The content of my presentation includes:

  • Why use social media to curate and create curriculum?
  • How do the seven social media strategies work?
  • Strategy 1: Collect, Curate, and Share Knowledge.
  • Strategy 2: Engage with Virtual Communities of Practice.
  • Strategy 3: Identify, Archive, and Share Information.
  • Strategy 4: Follow Blogs, Microblogs, and Aggregators.
  • Strategy 5: Listen to, Create, and Share Audio.
  • Strategy 6: View, Create, and Share Photos.
  • Strategy 7: Watch, Create, and Share Videos.
  • What are social media best practices?
  • Presentation summary

You can watch a video of my presentation via YouTube or embedded below:

I also invite you to view the presentation that goes with this video below or via SlideShare:

Serendipity+?

Yesterday I recorded a video for my online UCLA Extension Social Media Marketing course (MGMNT X460.398A) in an area under construction near my apartment in the Sports City area of Dubai, UAE. I’ve been living her shortly after I started teaching for Jumeira University this September.

Designed to mirror the content of Gary Vaynerchuck’s book Jab, Jab, Jab, Right Hook, the course challenges students to create a content marketing plan for a product, service, individual, or organization of their choice.

google+-auto-backupThe theme of the week for which I recorded the video is “Embracing Emerging Options.” As presented in the Round (Chapter) 8, Opportunities in Emerging Networks, the emerging social networks include LinkedIn, Google+, Vine, and Snapchat.

While today and even when the book was first published in November 2013 these platforms weren’t “new” in the literal sense none had yet achieved critical mass.

That said, Snapchat has quickly gained momentumVine has seen impressive growth,  LinkedIn has aggressively evolved from its initial role as an “online Rolodex,” yet the role and relevance of Google+ continues to fluctuate.

I was invited to join Google+ three years ago, early into it’s Beta launch. In the more than three years since I am still not quite sure what to do with it nor have I seen tremendous engagement on it, but I remain cautiously optimistic.

Speaking of which, if you’re not already doing so, please stop by my Google+ profile and follow me; I will do the same and, together we can enhance our experience on this platform with potential.

However, I actively use the Google+ Auto Backup feature and continue to be amused by the Google+ Auto Awesome functionality for photos and for Google+ Auto Awesome for videos as well.

And so it was remarkably coincidental (and strangely sentient) for Google+ to “Auto Awesome” my UCLA Extension video that included content about Google+ just a few hours later. It includes footage from the video I shot plus still shots I also took (yes, including a selfie; for shame).

Interestingly, it removed the actual audio track and made it more of a montage. More intriguing was the awkward yet entertaining  1980s sitcom style music Google+ added to the video!

So, without further delay, I present to you my Auto Awesome video:

Have you ever been Auto Awesomed?

Happy New Year!

The end of 2011 marks the completion of the earth’s most recent 365-day journey around the sun and the start of a new 366-day journey on the same orbit (2012 is a leap year).

The past year provided an ample inventory of inspiration against which we can gauge our own lives. One unique barometer by which we can measure what mattered in our lives is Google’s Zeitgeist. What is a zeitgeist?

According to dictionary.com, a zeitgeist is “the spirit of the time; general trend of thought or feeling characteristic of a particular period of time.”

As further explained by Google’s website, “Zeitgeist sorted billions of Google searches to capture the year’s 10 fastest-rising global queries and the rest of the spirit of 2011.”

One unique representation of this data is the video below which allows you to re-live the top events and moments from 2011:

What was most memorable about 2011 for you?