Innovation is the engine of opportunity. At its core is a commitment to experiential learning that encourages critical thinking and creative problem-solving while also engaging soft skills.

uae_innovates_qrThis mindset is fundamental to the future of the United Arab Emirates. So much so that, it is part of the ‘United in Knowledge’ pillar of Vision 2021 which focuses on innovative Emiratis building a competitive economy.

Emphasizing it’s importance, H.H Sheikh Mohammed Bin Rashid Al Maktoum explained, “Innovation is not an option, but a necessity. It is not a culture, but work style, and governments and companies that do not innovate risk losing their competitiveness and falling far behind.”

Having taught INV 300, Innovation and Entrepreneurship at the American University in the Emirates since 2018, I am fortunate to actively participate in this process. In support of my engagement in entrepreneurship education, on May 31, 2018 I was selected as one of 30 educators from a pool of more than 400 by the United Arab Emirates Ministry of Education to join “Cohort 3″ of the “UAE Innovation and Entrepreneurship Education Program.”

Some background on the program:

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What is design thinking?  According to Coe Leta Stafford, Managing Director of IDEO U, “design thinking is a process for creative problem solving.” Fundamentally human-centric, it encourages organizations to focus on their customers first; this leads to the development of human-centered goods, services, and processes.

Design thinking is about solving problems for people by asking questions differently. Essentially, it provides a pathway through which you can improve your creative process — and turn an idea into action.  The entire design thinking process is comprised of five stages: 1. Empathize, 2. Define, 3. Ideate, 4. Prototype, 5. Test.

According to the Stanford d.school publication. “An Introduction to Design Thinking: PROCESS GUIDE,” the five stages of the design thinking process can be explained as follows:

1. Empathize: Learn about the audience for whom you are designing. Empathy is the centerpiece of a human-centered design process; it is the work you do to understand people, within the context of your design challenge. It is your effort to understand the way they do things and why, their physical and emotional needs, how they think about world, and what is meaningful to them.

2. Define: Construct a point of view that is based on user needs and insights. The Define mode of the design process is all about bringing clarity and focus to the design space. It is your chance, and responsibility, as a design thinker to define the challenge you are taking on, based on what you have learned about your user and about the context. After becoming an instant-expert on the subject and gaining invaluable empathy for the person you are designing for, this stage is about making sense of the widespread information you have gathered. In a word, the Define mode is sensemaking.

Ideate: Brainstorm and come up with creative solutions. Ideate is the mode of the design process in which you concentrate on idea generation. Mentally it represents a process of “going wide” in terms of concepts and outcomes. Ideation provides both the fuel and also the source material for building prototypes and getting innovative solutions into the hands of your users.

3. Prototype: Build a representation of one or more of your ideas to show to others.The Prototype mode is the iterative generation of artifacts intended to answer questions that get you closer to your final solution. In the early stages of a project that question may be broad – such as “do my users enjoy cooking in a competitive manner?”

In these early stages, you should create low-resolution prototypes that are quick and cheap to make (think minutes and cents) but can elicit useful feedback from users and colleagues. In later stages both your prototype and question may get a little more refined. For example, you may create a later stage prototype for the cooking project that aims to find out: “do my users enjoy cooking with voice commands or visual commands”.

A prototype can be anything that a user can interact with – be it a wall of post-it notes, a gadget you put together, a role-playing activity, or even a storyboard. Ideally you bias toward something a user can experience. Walking someone through a scenario with a storyboard is good, but having them role-play through a physical environment that you have created will likely bring out more emotions and responses from that person.

4. Test: Return to your original user group and testing your ideas for feedback. Test mode is when you solicit feedback about your prototypes from your users and have another opportunity to gain empathy for the people you are designing for.

Testing is another opportunity to understand your user, but unlike your initial empathy mode, you have now likely done more framing of the problem and created prototypes to test. Both these things tend to focus the interaction with users, but don’t reduce your “testing” work to asking whether or not people like your solution. Instead, continue to ask “Why?”, and focus on what you can learn about the person and the problem as well as your potential solutions.

Ideally you can test within a real context of the user’s life. For a physical object, ask people to take it with them and use it within their normal routines. For an experience, try to create a scenario in a location that would capture the real situation. If testing a prototype is not possible, frame a more realistic situation by having users take on a role or task when approaching your prototype. A rule of thumb: always prototype as if you know you’re right, but test as if you know you’re wrong—testing is the chance to refine your solutions and make them better.

To further understand design thinking I invite you to view the following video, “The Design Thinking Process;” it cleverly and clearly explains the five stages in just under four minutes.

The main priority of the Year 3 project is to ensure the sustainability of the innovation and entrepreneurship curriculum in the UAE, with an additional focus on developing a core group of Program Ambassadors to deepen the impact of innovation and entrepreneurship education in the UAE. Year 3 program components are organized into 3 categories:

  1. Create and Develop an I&E Curriculum
  2. Support the Teaching of the I&E Curriculum
  3. Facilitate the Growth of the I&E Ecosystem

It is my honor to represent the American University in the Emirates as a pivotal part of this initiative and I am excited to contribute to innovation and entrepreneurship educational efforts in the UAE!

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Happy 14th birthday to my sweet and smart son, Jacob! He has overcome many challenges in his short number of years, but he has always been happy and kind to everyone, confronting his issues with grace, determination, and humor. A natural musician he plays piano and saxophone, making the world more melodic and meaningful in the process. It’s challenging for us both with my living so far away, but he is always close by in my heart (along with my younger son, Max). I am so inspired by the person Jacob is and the man he is becoming!

Two years ago I began my journey from California to Dubai. I took two United flights on September 7, 2014: one from Los Angeles International Airport (LAX) to Washington Dulles International Airport (IAD); then my second from IAD to Dubai International Airport (DXB).

MG@LAX

After flying 9,357 miles and traveling nearly 22 hours — including an almost 4 hour delay in Dulles  — I arrived in Dubai the evening of September 8, 2014. Coincidentally Lady Gaga arrived that evening for her first UAE concert ever two days later.

My time in Dubai has presented me with many challenges and many rewards as well; it’s certainly shaped me as a person and a professional. I have been enriched with memories and moments I would have not encountered elsewhere. Being an expat has been a notable time in my life; I am fortunate to have experienced it.

Having taught only adjunct prior to leaving the US, I experienced an evolution from “feral to formal” (as I call it) at two universities: Jumeira University and now American University in the Emirates (AUE). I am grateful for those experiences and treasure the time I’ve had here; I feel I’ve made a difference and made an impact.

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The biggest challenge and source of uncertainty for me has been not being present in lives of my two sons, Jacob and Max; especially Jacob, who turns 13 on the 10th (which was my first day at Jumeira University in 2014). I’m mindful of the short number of years I have left until they leave for college.

I’m at a point of pause as I determine my next steps. I am unsure where I might find myself in the future and what I might be doing; remaining here is an option as well. I have enjoyed living in Dubai — where Bedouin meets Blade Runner (my idea for a new tourism slogan; what do you think?). It is a crossroads of cultures and has given me an experience unlike anywhere else.

So, here’s to two years; may the next two — wherever they are — be as meaningful and memorable! To further explore my experiences in or about Dubai, please read the following:

The Pod(cast) people have returned!

satisfactionistThe second part of my appearance on The Satisfactionist Podcast with Ben Olmos has been published. Be sure to also read the blog post about my first appearance.

Once again it was a great experience and, it appears Ben and I might collaborate on future episodes of the podcast; more to come soon!

This is the second of two podcasts in which I will appear (the previous podcast was published one week ago). My interview begins at 22:58; listen to it on SoundCloud below or you can also hear it on Stitcher.

Topics tackled in this episode include:

The “Gig Economy” and my “minor league pitching” experience teaching traffic school where I developed my classroom management skills. This lead to my adventures as an adjunct instructor for 9 years — during which I have taught 3,000 to 4,000 students in 70 courses (with numerous sections) at 16 different universities in 2 countries.

This lead to my work designing curriculum and developing courses that I taught and those I was specifically contracted to create without teaching them. We chat about my favorite word — rubrics — although, as an instructor, I am careful about when I use them to limit students from obsessing about matching their rubric to a specific grade.

We then discuss how I found my way to Dubai where I have been teaching marketing and management courses since September 2014. My expat experience was inspired by the possibility of my participating in a program with UCLA Extension in which I would teach for 30 day cycles in Saudi Arabia.

Unfortunately, that opportunity never came to fruition, but it did make me realize there was an entire world of opportunities outside of the United States — including two opportunities in Kabul, Afghanistan that I decided to pass on.

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We then explore my exceptional experiences living and working in Dubai where I have been widely welcomed by the local population and individuals from elsewhere who call UAE their home. I share details of driving the roads and roundabouts — including some Google Map misadventures!

I discuss the surprisingly temperate weather during the winter months (mid-October to mid-April) along with other aspects of daily life, including the impressive integration of SMS functionality and mobile phones into everything from paying speeding tickets to paying to park.

I also elaborate on my admiration for my students and the effort they invest into their education; they take their role as the next generation seriously and are focused on being prepared for the responsibilities with which they will be entrusted.

Notably, a large percentage of students at my current university — American University in the Emirates (AUE) — are Emirati (approximately 70%) and most of the remaining percentage are from other Arab countries or elsewhere in the world. In total I have students with 30 different nationalities here. It’s a wonderfully worldly experience!

Although it is challenging to be so far from my 10 and 12-year-old sons, traveling 8,000 miles from the life I had known to finally find a foothold in the life I had fruitlessly worked towards in the United States.

Similarly, contrary to the absurdity of the current election cycle in the United States, my experience in Dubai has been a rewarding and enriching one; I am grateful for this unique opportunity and am making sure to maximize the moment.

edx_logo_finalLastly I introduce and explain the ways my book, edX E-Learning Course Development, can be used by teachers and trainers to prepare, produce, and promote a course on edX or Open edX.

I explained my unique approach to starting each chapter with an anecdote, quote, or pop culture reference, additionally outlining how I worked from edX technical documentation, rearranging and re-imagining it in a way that aligns more accurately with the way an individual would create or convert curriculum.

We then boldly go on to discuss my experience as an extra on the upcoming Star Trek Beyond movie where I was on set for 17 hours straight!

Beam me up!

Hear ye, hear ye!

satisfactionistI’ve been featured on The Satisfactionist Podcast with Ben Olmos; what a delightful experience! What is a Satisfactionist? According to the podcast’s Facebook page, a Satisfactionist is:

…a person who seeks to promote well-being through the act of teaching good people lessons that will enable them to create and do amazing things for themselves and the people they work with.

This is the first of two podcasts in which I will appear. My interview begins at 46:56; listen to it on SoundCloud below or you can also hear it on Stitcher.

During the roughly 1 hour and 20 minute interview Ben and I discuss my professional journey to becoming a teacher and trainer — along with personal experiences that have shaped who I am and who I aspire to be.

Topics we talked about include: living in California, my educational experience at UC Santa Barbara and Woodbury University, a review of early employment including my first job as a paper route “collector,” my odd summer job as a “Christmas Elf,” and my time as a mathematically challenged bank teller.

andydickWe then fast forward to my first “real” job as a technical writer for a medical device manufacturer. This position lead to my marketing career with companies including the publisher of Cat Fancy, City of Hope, and Princess Cruises. Ben and I also discussed my marketing consulting work with clients like Andy Dick and Mike Garson, longtime keyboardist for David Bowie.

Finally we talk about my non-traditional transformation into teaching and the many mentors who guided me to where I am today (including Andrew Posey, Satinder Dhiman, Barry Bailey, and Chuck Lubbers).

I also briefly explain my very brief tenure in the “Ethics Office” at Los Angeles Unified School District, which indirectly inspired me to embrace adjuncting. Ben and I go on to discuss my adventures in academia including best practices and my 7 years when I was exclusively adjuncting in the “gig economy.”

In the second podcast Ben and I discuss my experiences as a full-time faculty member in Dubai; first at Jumeira University and now at American University in the Emirates (AUE). We will also talk about my book, “edX e-Learning Course Development” and a few other timely topics!

Be sure to also read about my second appearance on The Satisfactionist Podcast.

One year ago I started a new chapter in my life.

edx-book-nader-cutout-250Technically I published eight of them in my very first book “edX E-Learning Course Development,” a 300 page manual that helps university teachers and corporate trainers design, develop, and deploy an interactive and informative MOOC course for the edX platform.

It walks a reader through eight steps to create an edX course while teaching them about tools and techniques to know as an edX instructor. Those eight steps are presented in eight chapters which include:

  1. Getting Started: an overview of MOOCs and the history of edX.
  2. Planning the Curriculum:curriculum development.
  3. Producing Videos: video production best practices.
  4. Designing Exercises: options for exercises and assessments.
  5. Integrating the Curriculum: options for adding course materials.
  6. Administering Your Course: your course’s administrative options.
  7. Facilitating Your Course: your role as a facilitator of your edX course.
  8. Promoting Your Course:  a strategy to market your course.

Reading the book will teach you:

  • How to navigate edX, sign up for Studio, and create your own edX course.
  • How to use video production best practices and convert your classroom lectures to instructional videos.
  • How to create engaging assessments and effective exercises that achieve your course’s learning objectives.
  • How to publish an announcement, attach a course syllabus, add instructional pages, and upload course handouts.
  • How to establish your edX course settings, view and modify course content, and import and export your course.
  • How to market your course to increase enrollment and create an enjoyable educational experience for your students.

I was invited to write edX E-Learning Course Development by an acquisition editor at Packt Publishing, who contacted me through my LinkedIn profile.

My experience developing and teaching online courses with learning management systems including Blackboard, Canvas, eCollege, Moodle, and Sakai was a factor. I was also creating training courses and overseeing the implementation of Open edX — the open source version of edX — as a training platform for a software company in Santa Barbara, California. That influenced Packt’s decision to offer me the book as well.

My writing process involved first outlining the entire book and then working with a content  development editor along with very appreciated volunteer reviewers to write two to five drafts of each chapter; then I worked with a technical editor for to finalize the proofs.

BGFYtdWqjg4While filled with challenges, writing the book was rewarding because the process gave me a reason to research edX and more fully understand how it works technically and operationally.

As an educator and lifelong learner, it fills me with pride knowing edX E-Learning Course Development helps people better educate others.

Writing the book also gave me the confidence that I could finish a book – a 300 page technical manual nonetheless!

You can learn more about and purchase the book on Amazon or on the Packt Publishing website.

 

“I don’t Twitter, I don’t MyFace, I don’t YearBook.” — Bill Belichick, Coach of the New England Patriots

twitter-logo-125There are two kinds of people in this world: people who love Twitter and people who love to hate Twitter; there seems to be very little room in between.

Unlike the coach of my favorite NFL team, I fall into the first category; although at first I wasn’t quite sure what to do with it. Being confused and uncertain is a common experience among first time Twitter users.

I first signed up for Twitter six years ago — on November 19, 2008 — in the computer lab of the DeVry University in Bakersfield, California (where I had been teaching classes earlier that day). I quickly found it suited my stream of consciousness style of thinking and need for newly acquired knowledge.

I have since found Twitter to be a transformational and transactional social media tool. I’ve used it to network personally and professionally, curate content for courses I’ve created and/or taught, and even credit Twitter for helping me get a teaching position with UCLA Extension.

Since first tackling Twitter I have expanded to the four accounts below, though at this point I primarily use @MatthewAGilbert.

My most unique Twitter experience involved Matthew Gilbert — not me, but the the TV critic for the Boston Globe. One day while teaching a class at UC Santa Barbara I received an email from him. He asked that since I had control over, but was not using @MatthewGilbert, would I be so kind as to let him use it.

I actually knew of him and over time had been confused for him. One particularly entertaining moment of confused identity was when I was recording my appearance on the short-lived CBS game show “Winning Lines.”

The producers were running scared because, since I was born in Boston and we had the same name, they assumed I was the “other” Matthew Gilbert and that I had somehow infiltrated the show to “scoop” it before it aired!

In any case, I only briefly thought about his request and then decided to let him use the Twitter account; how could I deny my namesake? Besides, in an effort to personally brand myself, I always use my middle initial — A — because there are quite a large number of “other other” Matthew Gilbert’s!

In response he posted a very cordial tweet (from the new account). From time to time we tweet each other and, more recently, he acquired the domain www.matthewgilbert.com from me top promote his new book: Off the Leash.

@matthewgilbert_shoutout_to_@matthewagilbert_20110712

So, in six short years on Twitter I not only found my way to new professional and personal opportunities, but I found myself (well, sort of). Thank you for a superb six years, Twitter — I look forward to the next six with enthusiasm and excitement!

Since yesterday was Father’s Day in the United States, today’s Music Monday celebrates the special bond between dads and their kids.

There are many songs that capture this unique relationship, but a song that was always powerful and poignant to me was one of Paul McCartney’s lesser known pieces: Put it There. Released in 1990 as a single to McCartney’s 1989 album, Flowers in the Dirt (affiliate link), the song reached number 32 on the UK singles chart.

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McCartney’s eighth solo studio album, Flowers in the Dirt was considered a major return as its release inaugurated his first world tour since his Wings Over the World tour in 1975/1976. The album’s musical quality was widely celebrated, earning McCartney his best reviews in years.

I share the same thoughts as those reviews, having always found the album beautifully written and masterfully performed. Notably, the album has added meaning because I attended the April 1, 1990 show of the Paul McCartney World Tour at UC Berkeley‘s California Memorial Stadium. I even found a setlist from the concert (complete with links to YouTube clips of each song performed)!

Having always found “Put it There” a touching tribute to a unique father/son relationship, the track took on added meaning when I became a dad to my two sons. If you listen to the lyrics (and/or read them — they are included below), you will understand the sweet, yet understated emotion of what the song is communicating: unconditional love.

Sometimes, as the song explains, simply having someone to hold your hand can fix any problem — or at least make you feel better while you confront it. Shamefully, the importance of fathers is often overlooked, but at least in my experience, my father (and, in fairness, my stepmother too) has made all the difference in my life recently.

In my own experience, knowing someone is unconditionally in my corner has made all the difference. My grandfather filled that role for me and I plan to do the same for my sons. Surely as they grow older their problems won’t be as easily resolved as they were as they are as children, but knowing they are loved and supported without question will always be essential to their well being.

Although my connection with my Dad was, unfortunately, interrupted for several years, I am grateful to have a renewed relationship with him. I am also thankful my sons can “put it there” — not just with me, but with my Dad as well.  Likewise, I look forward to continuing this tradition with my son’s children in the future.

And so, if you are thankful for your father, put it there!

Put it There Lyrics

Give Me Your Hand I’d Like To Shake It
I Want To Show You I’m Your Friend.
You’ll Understand If I Can Make It Clear
Its All That Matters In The End.
Put It There If It Weighs A Ton,
That’s What The Father Said To His Younger Son.
I Don’t Care If It Weighs A Ton,
As Long As You And I Are Here, Put It There.
Long As You And I Are Here, Put It There.

If There’s A Fight I’d Like To Fix It,
I Hate To See Things Go So Wrong.
The Darkest Night And All It’s Mixed Emotions,
Is Getting Lighter Sing A Song.

Sometimes you are just too “F***ing Great” for your own good.

Early last week an irreverent and entertaining YouTube video for Dollar Shave Club (affiliate link), a Santa Monica, California start-up that ships razors directly to customers who subscribe to the company’s monthly delivery service, virally spread across the Internet faster than blood streaks down your chin when you cut yourself shaving.

The promise made by Dollar Shave Club Co-Founder & CEO Michael Dubin in the video (below): their blades are not good, they are  “F***ing Great!”

Social medianew media, and mainstream media were all abuzz with articles about the video and the company’s charismatic CEO. It went viral and the company went from unknown to unstoppable almost overnight.

The video — which cost $4,500 to produce — was uploaded on Monday, March 5, 2012 and, just 11 days later by Friday, March 16 (as of the time when this blog post was published) had 3,456,727 views  — an average of 314,247 per day!

Did views equate to conversion? Yes. According to a Huffington Post article posted on March 8, Dollar Shave Club had already generated 5,000 sign-ups. Imagine how many more signed up in the eight days since then; the video was so popular it caused Dollar Shave Club’s website to crash!

The company’s subscription based razor blade service offers three options:

  • The Humble Twin: Two blades and five cartridge refills — for a monthly cost of $1, plus $2 shipping.
  • 4X: A four-blade razor with four cartridges refills — which costs $6 per month with shipping included.
  • The Executive:Six-blades and three cartridge refills — for a monthly cost of $9 with shipping included.

They also offer affiliate arrangement and provides a unique URL (e.g., https://www.dollarshaveclub.com/ref/l14/13za2y7) with which members can refer others. The deal is simple: for every new account your link refers, you get one month of free service.

Founded in April 2011 by Dubin and his partner Mark Levine, Dollar Shave Club officially launched with the upload of the YouTube video. Despite it’s kitschy video, Dollar Shave Club is well funded, having announced almost $1 million in funding from Kleiner Perkins Caufield & Byers and Forerunner Ventures. Other funding sources include Andreessen Horowitz, Shasta Ventures and Felicis Ventures. It also received $100,000 in angel funding from Science, Inc. (which was founded by former Myspace CEO Mike Jones).

How does the business offer such competitive prices? Two words (rather, two countries): China and Korea. The razors the company sells are private-labeled products shipped directly to each subscriber from manufacturers in both countries — “cutting” out the middleman. But therein might lie the problem.

On Friday, March 16 at 3:38 p.m (Pacific) the company sent a letter to new subscribers who opted for the 4x razor with the following message:

In the e-mail Dubin earnestly explains the situation as follows:

Last week the Internet came to visit, and as a result, we’re unable to fulfill your 4X order right now. 

Yes, we think this sucks too. But we’re giving you options.

Here they are:

  • If you’d like to hold your place in line, do nothing, and you will receive your first shipment on May 15th.
  • If you’d like your $6 refund, no problem. Please Click this link. Log in, and click the refund button. We’ll handle the rest.

Please accept our sincere apologies for not being able to meet initial demand. We’ll make sure it doesn’t happen again.

Humbly,

Michael Dubin
Co-Founder & CEO
Dollar Shave Club

It is unclear if the delayed delivery affects all three razor options or if it is limited to the 4X razor. The supply delay could be more easily remedied if it is the latter and not the former — perhaps people could just switch their subscription? But, then again, the e-mail does not provide that option — so it is as yet unknown how significant this problem might actually be.

Update as of March 18, 2012: A colleague informed me he subscribed to the “Humble Twin” and also received an e-mail informing him of a delivery delay, but in his case it was only for one month, not two. He elected to wait and see.

Regardless, a two month delay — even a one month delay — is not a good way to begin a business relationship with new customers. Delaying consumer gratification is one of the worst sins a retailer (or in this case a wholesaler) can commit — once you lose that leverage most customers lose interest and go elsewhere.

As Tim Daloisio (whose screen shot of the e-mail he received is posted above) offered in a tweet: “Easier to win a customer the first time than to win them back — better luck next time @dollarshaveclub #fail.

Perhaps this was all too good to be true? Sales data was not made available so it is hard to know how many people were affected.

But, if you assume that, since they signed up 5,000 people in the first three days (1,667 new accounts per day), in eleven days there could be as many as 18,337 new subscribers.

If you further assume customers subscribed to each of the three options in equal numbers (also not likely, but for the sake of easy arithmetic, let’s keep things simple), there might be 6,112 sadly stubbled 4X subscribers. For shave! I mean, for shame!

At $6 per subscription there could be at total of $36,672 in revenue that was generated but for which no products were delivered. Not a king’s ransom by any means, but certainly not an insignificant amount.

But, more importantly, the company’s inability to meet the demand beg’s the question: had they already ordered inventory or were they waiting to see what the demand actually was?

Perhaps this was the case. From a business standpoint, why sink thousands of dollars into products if you are unsure they will be sold? And, in fairness, projecting and meeting demand is one of the more challenging tasks with which a business must contend.

But the fact remains that, despite their impressive funding and savvy marketing, the delay calls into question Dollar Shave Club’s operational abilities.

To their credit, they have provided an option to cancel and get a refund or to stay put and wait until the razors can ship on May 15th.

However, it could have been an added measure of good faith had Dollar Shave Club offered one month of free service for each month of delay.

Additionally, the company fairly clearly outlines their terms of cancellation in their Terms of Service (which we can also assume nobody has read).

However, as noted in an article titled How to Quickly Read a Terms of Service [Law], “Dollar Shave Club does a good job of explaining how to stop the membership, but requires a vague “reasonable amount of time” to cancel. You might be on the hook for another month.” Food for thought.

Lastly, and perhaps most importantly, Dollar Shave Club needs to make sure it does not violate the “30-Day Rule” established by the Federal Trade Commission (FTC). The relevant portion of this law is explained below:

The Rule requires that when you advertise merchandise, you must have a reasonable basis for stating or implying that you can ship within a certain time. If you make no shipment statement, you must have a reasonable basis for believing that you can ship within 30 days. That is why direct marketers sometimes call this the “30-day Rule.”

If, after taking the customer’s order, you learn that you cannot ship within the time you stated or within 30 days, you must seek the customer’s consent to the delayed shipment. If you cannot obtain the customer’s consent to the delay — either because it is not a situation in which you are permitted to treat the customer’s silence as consent and the customer has not expressly consented to the delay, or because the customer has expressly refused to consent — you must, without being asked, promptly refund all the money the customer paid you for the unshipped merchandise.

So, despite having initially been lathered with success, let’s hope that Dollar Shave Club doesn’t cut it too close and improves its operations. Maybe they can even shave a few weeks of that two month delay?

Update: I finally received my order of 4X blades on Saturday, May 26, 2012!