The Pod(cast) people have returned!

satisfactionistThe second part of my appearance on The Satisfactionist Podcast with Ben Olmos has been published. Be sure to also read the blog post about my first appearanceOnce again it was a great experience and, it appears Ben and I might collaborate on future episodes of the podcast; more to come soon!

This is the second of two podcasts in which I will appear (the previous podcast was published one week ago). You can listen to it on Apple Podcasts Preview starting at 22:58 here:  https://podcasts.apple.com/us/podcast/satisfactionist-live/id1111996307?i=1000371472814. You can also listen to my segment on YouTube below.

Topics tackled in this episode include:

  • The “Gig Economy” and my “minor league pitching” experience teaching traffic school where I developed my classroom management skills. This lead to my adventures as an adjunct instructor for 9 years — during which I have taught 3,000 to 4,000 students in 70 courses (with numerous sections) at 16 different universities in 2 countries.
  • This lead to my work designing curriculum and developing courses that I taught and those I was specifically contracted to create without teaching them. We chat about my favorite word — rubrics — although, as an instructor, I am careful about when I use them to limit students from obsessing about matching their rubric to a specific grade.
  • We then discuss how I found my way to Dubai where I have been teaching marketing and management courses since September 2014. My expat experience was inspired by the possibility of my participating in a program with UCLA Extension in which I would teach for 30 day cycles in Saudi Arabia. Unfortunately, that opportunity never came to fruition, but it did make me realize there was an entire world of opportunities outside of the United States — including two opportunities in Kabul, Afghanistan that I decided to pass on.

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  • We then explore my exceptional experiences living and working in Dubai where I have been widely welcomed by the local population and individuals from elsewhere who call UAE their home. I share details of driving the roads and roundabouts — including some Google Map misadventures!
  • I discuss the surprisingly temperate weather during the winter months (mid-October to mid-April) along with other aspects of daily life, including the impressive integration of SMS functionality and mobile phones into everything from paying speeding tickets to paying to park.
  • I also elaborate on my admiration for my students and the effort they invest into their education; they take their role as the next generation seriously and are focused on being prepared for the responsibilities with which they will be entrusted.
  • Notably, a large percentage of students at my current university — American University in the Emirates (AUE) — are Emirati (approximately 70%) and most of the remaining percentage are from other Arab countries or elsewhere in the world. In total I have students with 30 different nationalities here. It’s a wonderfully worldly experience! Although it is challenging to be so far from my 10 and 12-year-old sons, traveling 8,000 miles from the life I had known to finally find a foothold in the life I had fruitlessly worked towards in the United States.
  • Similarly, contrary to the absurdity of the current election cycle in the United States, my experience in Dubai has been a rewarding and enriching one; I am grateful for this unique opportunity and am making sure to maximize the moment.
  • edx_logo_finalLastly I introduce and explain the ways my book, edX E-Learning Course Development, can be used by teachers and trainers to prepare, produce, and promote a course on edX or Open edX.
  • I explained my unique approach to starting each chapter with an anecdote, quote, or pop culture reference, additionally outlining how I worked from edX technical documentation, rearranging and re-imagining it in a way that aligns more accurately with the way an individual would create or convert curriculum.
  • We then boldly go on to discuss my experience as an extra on the upcoming Star Trek Beyond movie where I was on set for 17 hours straight! Beam me up!

Hear ye, hear ye!

satisfactionistI’ve been featured on The Satisfactionist Podcast with Ben Olmos; what a delightful experience! What is a Satisfactionist? According to the podcast’s Facebook page, a Satisfactionist is:

a person who seeks to promote well-being through the act of teaching good people lessons that will enable them to create and do amazing things for themselves and the people they work with.

This is the first of two podcasts in which I will appear. You can listen to my episode on Apple Podcasts Preview starting at 46:56 here: https://podcasts.apple.com/us/podcast/satisfactionist-live/id1111996307?i=1000371042794. You can also listen to my full segment on YouTube below:

During the roughly 1 hour and 20 minute interview Ben and I discuss my professional journey to becoming a teacher and trainer — along with personal experiences that have shaped who I am and who I aspire to be.

Topics we talked about include:

  • Living in California, my educational experience at UC Santa Barbara and Woodbury University, a review of early employment including my first job as a paper route “collector,” my odd summer job as a “Christmas Elf,” and my time as a mathematically challenged bank teller.
  • We then fast forward to my first “real” job as a technical writer for a medical device manufacturer. This position lead to my marketing career with companies including the publisher of Cat Fancy, City of Hope, and Princess Cruises. Ben and I also discussed my marketing consulting work with clients like Andy Dick and Mike Garson, longtime keyboardist for David Bowie.
  • Finally we talk about my non-traditional transformation into teaching and the many mentors who guided me to where I am today (including Andrew Posey, Satinder Dhiman, Barry Bailey, and Chuck Lubbers). I also briefly explain my very brief tenure in the “Ethics Office” at Los Angeles Unified School District, which indirectly inspired me to embrace adjuncting. Ben and I go on to discuss my adventures in academia including best practices and my 7 years when I was exclusively adjuncting in the “gig economy.”

In the second podcast Ben and I discuss my experiences as a full-time faculty member in Dubai; first at Jumeira University and now at American University in the Emirates (AUE). We will also talk about my book, “edX e-Learning Course Development” and a few other timely topics!

Be sure to also read about my second appearance on The Satisfactionist Podcast.

One of my goals as an adjunct instructor — and reasons for this blog — is to share the pedagogical and professional knowledge I’ve gained through my experiences. To that end, I have blogged about celebrating my fifth year as an adjunct instructor and how I began my career in academia — along with insights into using social media to find a job.

As we approach the start of a new year — and now that it’s clear the Mayans were, in fact, wrong about the end of the world — many of you might be curious about starting a new career as an adjunct instructor. This blog post is designed to help you understand your options and leverage resources so you can do just that. To help you achieve your goal of becoming an adjunct instructor, I’d like to introduce you to Dr. Dani Babb.

An author, professor, and TV commentator, Dani is the Founder and CEO of The Babb Group, a provider of  resources and consulting for online professors, business owners and real estate investors. Her website, TheBabbGroup.com offers an array of  resources for online students and online teacherscurriculum vitae templates, professional CV writing services, an online teaching newsletter, and more.

One very helpful resource is a service that distributes monthly online teaching job leads via email. For $7 a month or $75 for a year (paid via PayPal) subscribers receive leads several times per week. Each lead includes the name of the school, the area of specialization, and the link or contact info to apply. All leads are verified by the Babb Group and you can cancel at anytime. According to information provided to me by Dani, the emails are a successful job search strategy:

  • Within Six Months:
    • 88% of subscribers with a doctorate degree find a job.
    • 55% of subscribers with a master’s degree find a job.
  • Within One Year:
    • 94% of subscribers with a doctorate degree find a job.
    • 77% of subscribers with a master’s degree find a job.

Additionally, in the video below, Dani shares the most frequently asked questions about getting your first online teaching job:

In summary, her advice (along with some of my additional insights) is to:

  1. Network with Online Teachers (0:21): The Babb Group manages two resources, a Facebook Group and a Yahoo Group, which are tools you can use to develop relationships with more than 6,500 online teachers. Another resource is the Chronicle of Higher Education Forums.
  2. Prepare Your Curriculum Vita (0:45): Unlike a typical professional resume an academic curriculum vita — commonly called a CV —  is a comprehensive accounting of your entire career. A CV should include your work history, education, special training, honors, publications, presentations, community service, and other related information. Write as many pages as is needed to communicate your experience, abilities, and interests.
  3. Strengthen Your Letter of Introduction (1:19): Summarize your strengths in a way that is relevant to the opportunity, highlighting areas of your expertise that position you as the perfect candidate. Be sure to include your letter in the body of your email (don’t attach it).
  4. Research the School and Position (1:31)If you are working from a canned introductory letter, research specific points about the school and include those. Know about the position along with the school, its students, and its educational approach.
  5. Think of Related Experience (1:42): If you have never before taught online think about ways you have experience educating adults. Have you helped others understand a new technology where you work? Have you guest lectured? Have you been an online student? Don’t overlook any angle you can use to illustrate relevant experience.
  6. List the Learning Management Systems You’ve Used (2:11): Include clearly in your CV a list of all learning management systems (LMS) you have used — as a student and instructor.
  7. Disregard Doctoral Degree Requirements (2:26): Even if a position requires a doctorate and you have a master’s degree apply anyway; you might satisfy the position’s requirements in other ways or there may be another position open at the university for which you are qualified.
  8. Be Persistent (2:36): Getting a job teaching online is a numbers game. The market is highly competitive, and there are more online adjuncts today than ever before. Persistence pays off, however: sometimes it can take more than 100 applications to get your first online teaching job.
  9. Use a Job Lead Service (3:00): If you don’t have the time to hunt for jobs, consider using the Babb Group’s service that distributes monthly online teaching job leads via email (described above).
  10. Have Transcripts and Recommendations Ready (3:10): Have transcripts and letters of recommendations ready when  human resources or a dean calls; demonstrate your responsiveness and responsibility with actions!

In conclusion, as Dani explains in her video, even if you’ve never taught online, there’s no time like the present to start. We’ve all had no experience at one point, so why not start your online teaching experience now?