“Yusajel Hadaf!”

eafl-shieldThis phrase can be heard among Arabic speaking people in the United Arab Emirates (UAE) when their football (soccer) team scores a goal. However, the 2012 founding of the Emirates American Football League (EAFL) along with changes in athletic interests that include the National Football League (NFL) could change this.

Recognizing the increasing relevance of American football globally and in the UAE, I wrote a chapter about the EAFL in the book The Routledge Handbook of International Sport Business profiling its social media strategy. Titled “Arabian Gulf Game Plan: The social media marketing strategy of the Emirates American Football League,” the chapter:

  • Explores the origins of the EAFL.
  • Looks ahead to the future of the league and American football in UAE.
  • Shares the league’s social media strategy as a means of marketing while creating a community of fans, players and their families.

On May 1, 2017 I presented my chapter to faculty, students, and staff at the American University in the Emirates (AUE). I joined with two AUE colleagues who also contributed a chapter to the book: Prof. Kamilla Swart and Dr. Kevin Heisey, who is also one of the book’s editors.

This was the third “Library Distinguished Guest Speaker Series” event hosted by the Library and Information Resource Center (LIRC) and the Office of Research and Advancement at AUE. I previously presented my book, “edX E-Learning Course Development” at the inaugural event of the series.

You can watch a recording of my presentation below via YouTube (it was originally streamed live to my Facebook page):

The Routledge Handbook of International Sport Business is an essential resource for any course on sport business, sport management or international business. The book, which was published in September 2017, offers the broadest and most in-depth guide to the key themes in international sport business today, covering every core area from strategy and marketing to finance, media, and the law.

“Walking with a friend in the dark is better than walking alone in the light.” — Helen Keller

Here’s my video wrap-up of Raj Kotecha‘s successful “My Friends Your Friends” networking event on March 1st at Dusty’s Dubai. “My Friends Your Friends,” is a social gathering where everyone is connected through mutual friends. Attendees are invited by the hosts (of which I was one), who will ensure you have a great time and get the most value from attending.

Hosts are responsible for bringing along friends with an eclectic mix of stories, interests and goals. The hosts will ensure you always know somebody and make memorable connections.

More than 200 interesting, intriguing, and intelligent individuals shared great conversations, started new relationships, and enjoyed an environment where luck felt at home. I was honored to be one of the 14 hosts and am already looking forward to the next event!

Here’s my video recap of the event (originally posted on my Facebook page):

“It’s the teacher that makes the difference, not the classroom.” — Michael Morpurgo

On Monday, February 13, 2017 I invited the world to join my MKT 200, Principles of Marketing class at American University in the Emirates via a Facebook Live broadcast.  Watching the video — which, for some reason, is unfortunately a low quality — you can get a feel for how I teach along with the way I manage my classroom and students, both engaged and disruptive.

There is even a related discussion about product design and human-computer interaction in addition to some real-world examples of my younger years playing Pong and an early version of Castle Wolfenstein with a friend!

I invite you to watch the video below via YouTube (it was originally streamed live to my Facebook page); you can also watch me lecturing about value in another marketing class via YouTube.

Primarily this class was a review for a quiz that I gave to my students two days later, but it also offers an overview of foundational marketing concepts, including the following:

  • Core Beliefs and Values: persistent and are passed on from parents to children and are reinforced by schools, churches, businesses, and government.
  • Customer Lifetime Value: the value of the entire stream of purchases that the customer would make over a lifetime of patronage.
  • Customer Relationship Management (CRM): the overall process of building and maintaining profitable customer relationships by delivering superior customer value and satisfaction.
  • Demands: Wants backed by buying power.
  • Exchange: the act of obtaining a desired object from someone by offering something in return.
  • Macroenvironment: consists of the larger societal forces that affect the microenvironment—demographic, economic, natural, technological, political, and cultural forces.
  • Market Offerings: some combination of products, services, information, or experiences offered to a market to satisfy a need or want.
  • Market Positioning: the arranging for a product to occupy a clear, distinctive, and desirable place relative to competing products in the minds of target consumers.
  • Market Segment: a group of consumers who respond in a similar way to a given set of marketing efforts.
  • Market Segmentation: the division of a market into distinct groups of buyers who have different needs, characteristics, or behaviors and who might require separate products or marketing mixes.
  • Market Targeting: the process of evaluating each market segment’s attractiveness and selecting one or more segments to enter.
  • Marketing Environment: includes the actors and forces outside marketing that affect marketing management’s ability to build and maintain successful relationships with target customers.
  • Marketing Management: The art and science of choosing target markets and building profitable relationships with them.
  • Marketing Mix: the set of tools (four Ps) the firm uses to implement its marketing strategy. This set includes product, price, promotion, and place.
  • Marketing Strategy: the marketing logic by which the company hopes to create customer value and achieve profitable customer relationships.
  • Marketing: a process by which companies create value for customers and build strong customer relationships in order to capture value from customers in return.
  • Microenvironment: consists of the actors close to the company that affect its ability to serve its customers—the company, suppliers, marketing intermediaries, customer markets, competitors, and publics.
  • Needs: States of deprivation.
  • Target Marketing: Which segments to go after.
  • Value Proposition: the set of benefits or values it promises to deliver to customers to satisfy their needs.
  • Wants: The form that needs take.