Posts about marketing and related issues.

CPI Media Group and Tahawul Tech present “Evolve – A Digital Transformation Forum” on Tuesday, October 24 from 8:00 AM – 2:30 PM at the Jumeirah Beach Hotel in Dubai, UAE.  Attend this event for free by registering online at http://bit.ly/2kb3fI8!

Digital transformation is defined as the methodology enterprises can use to transform and create new business models and culture with digital technologies. The convergence of new digital technologies, including social media, mobile, cloud and embedded devices is presenting opportunities for businesses to transform their operations to gain competitive edge.

The C-suite plays a critical role in making transformation happen and research shows companies which have succeeded in delivering a fundamental transformation of their business through technology benefit from a significantly better financial performance than their peers. The event, which aims to attract more than 300 C-level digital leaders from public and private sectors, will shed light on the strategies needed for regional businesses to map out their transformation journey and how to go big with digital with the right vision and leadership.

The event will bring industry leaders to share their journey on how they have invested in technology which allowed them to transform their business. Delegates will learn from  speakers and have questions answered through an engaging and interactive forum including key-note speeches and panel discussions. There you will learn how digital and new technologies are disrupting companies and industries.

Attendees will also explore how your organization can progress to the next phase of digital transformation with significant, measurable business impact. Hear from industry luminaries about how they solved complex business challenges with effective approaches and technologies. Review the agenda for the day and register for free at: http://bit.ly/2kb3fI8

In addition to yesterday being the 10th anniversary of this blog it was also the publication date of a book in which I wrote a chapter about the social media marketing efforts of the Emirates American Football League (EAFL).

Recognizing the global role and relevance of American football, I wrote a chapter about the EAFL in the book The Routledge Handbook of International Sport Business profiling its social media strategy. Titled “Arabian Gulf Game Plan: The social media marketing strategy of the Emirates American Football League,” the chapter:

  • Explores the origins of the EAFL.
  • Looks ahead to the future of the league and American football in UAE.
  • Shares the league’s social media strategy as a means of marketing while creating a community of fans, players and their families.

The Routledge Handbook of International Sport Business is an essential resource for any course on sport business, sport management or international business. The book offers the broadest and most in-depth guide to the key themes in international sport business today, covering every core area from strategy and marketing to finance, media, and the law.

Including authors from more than twenty countries, this handbook addresses the most important issues in the world of sport business from a global perspective. Each chapter examines a particular cross-section of business and sport, encompassing all levels from grassroots to professional and elite. Divided into seven major subject areas, it offers insights from experts on:

  • International Sport Business Strategy.
  • Sport Marketing.
  • Sport Economics and Finance.
  • International Sport Law.
  • Sport Media and Communication.
  • Sport Tourism.
  • Sport Development.

The Routledge Handbook of International Sport Business is an essential resource for any course on sport business, sport management or international business. Notably, on May 1, 2017 I shared my chapter with faculty, students, and staff at the American University in the Emirates (AUE). I joined with two AUE colleagues who also contributed to the book: Prof. Kamilla Swart and Dr. Kevin Heisey, who is also one of the book’s editors.

“Yusajel Hadaf!”

eafl-shieldThis phrase can be heard among Arabic speaking people in the United Arab Emirates (UAE) when their football (soccer) team scores a goal. However, the 2012 founding of the Emirates American Football League (EAFL) along with changes in athletic interests that include the National Football League (NFL) could change this.

Recognizing the increasing relevance of American football globally and in the UAE, I wrote a chapter about the EAFL in the book The Routledge Handbook of International Sport Business profiling its social media strategy. Titled “Arabian Gulf Game Plan: The social media marketing strategy of the Emirates American Football League,” the chapter:

  • Explores the origins of the EAFL.
  • Looks ahead to the future of the league and American football in UAE.
  • Shares the league’s social media strategy as a means of marketing while creating a community of fans, players and their families.

On May 1, 2017 I presented my chapter to faculty, students, and staff at the American University in the Emirates (AUE). I joined with two AUE colleagues who also contributed a chapter to the book: Prof. Kamilla Swart and Dr. Kevin Heisey, who is also one of the book’s editors.

This was the third “Library Distinguished Guest Speaker Series” event hosted by the Library and Information Resource Center (LIRC) and the Office of Research and Advancement at AUE. I previously presented my book, “edX E-Learning Course Development” at the inaugural event of the series.

You can watch a recording of my presentation below via YouTube (it was originally streamed live to my Facebook page):

The Routledge Handbook of International Sport Business is an essential resource for any course on sport business, sport management or international business. The book, which was published in September 2017, offers the broadest and most in-depth guide to the key themes in international sport business today, covering every core area from strategy and marketing to finance, media, and the law.

“An investment in knowledge pays the best interest.” — Benjamin Franklin

I am proud to share that San Diego, California based National University​, where I have taught undergraduate communication and MBA marketing courses since 2009 (both online and on-campus), was recently ranked 47th by Online MBA Today! The MBA program is profiled as follows:

“The School of Business and Management at National University features an online Master of Business Administration with an emphasis in Marketing.

This 100% online MBA is based on five pillars of education the school prioritizes from the direction of its administration. The themes valued and taught include Relevance, Accessibility and Support, Specialization, Application, and Technology.

This degree is divided between 63 quarter units of graduate credit and is priced at $416 per quarter unit making the total cost of tuition $26,208. The four courses required for the Marketing concentration include Consumer Behavior, Global Marketing, Market Research, and Strategic Marketing Simulation.

Qualified students can complete this degree with a minimum course load of 16 courses and 63 quarter units while students lacking the required academic experience can expect to take up to 19 courses and be responsible for up to 76.5 quarter units.”

You can learn more about the MBA program here and watch a short video about the value of the degree from Dr. David W. Andrews, President of National University below:

Professor, Brand Yourself!

On March 16 from 2:30 to 3:00 pm at the at GESS Dubai I delivered my “Professor, Brand Yourself!” workshopGESS (Global Educational Supplies & Solutions) Dubai is the largest education event not just in the UAE but across the entire Middle East. It’s the only event that brings together all levels of educationalists together, in one place.

“Professor, Brand Yourself!” is a personal branding workshop for individuals working in higher education, vocational, and leadership/management positions. However, it also appeals to anyone wanting to develop their personal brand and learn how to leverage social media to promote themselves professionally.

Watch a recording of my workshop below via YouTube (it was originally streamed live to my Facebook page):

The workshop was designed to help individuals understand what personal branding is and what it is not, why personal branding is important personally and professionally, and how to create your personal brand. Attendees don’t need prior personal branding experience to participate in the workshop, which is organized into the following three sections:

1. What is a Personal Brand?
2. Why Do I Need a Personal Brand?
3. How Do I Create a Personal Brand?

At the conclusion of the workshop attendees should understand how to:

1. Define personal branding and its relevance.
2. Identify the most effective social platforms.
3. Develop and promote your personal brand.

The presentation slides I used are shared below via Slideshare:

On Saturday, February 11, 2017 at the Flora Grand Hotel in Dubai I joined two colleagues from American University in the Emirates (AUE) — Dr. Konrad Gunesch and Dr. Paul Mears — at the 6th International Conference on New Challenges in Management and Business.

The Conference addressed a range of critically important issues and themes relating to the management and business. The main topics of the conference will be held in two main fields and different panels:

  • Business Management and Strategy
  • Marketing Management

At the conference, in addition to enjoying learning about the research of fellow academics and researchers from all around the world, I presented my proposed paper, “Strengthen Your Social Media Marketing with Live Streaming Video.”  The abstract from my paper follows:

“Live streaming video is an emerging option marketers can use to connect with and convert consumers, especially via mobile devices. Mobile video is particularly promising: Cisco (2015) reveals 80 percent of Internet traffic will be video by 2019 and Brightcove (2016) reports that 74% of consumers are more likely to make a purchase after watching a branded video; 46% have done so. However, recorded video is costly and cumbersome to produce; live streaming video increases engagement and decreases costs (Piontek, 2015) while giving marketers increasing influence: Yeung (2016) reports that more than 110 years of live video is watched daily on Periscope. Facebook launched a live streaming service and YouTube has now followed suit (Hockenson, 2016). Recognizing that individuals and organizations alike can strengthen their social media marketing with live streaming video, this paper reviews the rise of social media, previews live streaming video, and shares live streaming video survey results.“

Watch the recorded Facebook Live broadcast of my presentation below via YouTube (it was originally live streamed to my Facebook page).

Slides from the presentation are available via Slideshare and embeded below for your review and reference.

“It’s the teacher that makes the difference, not the classroom.” — Michael Morpurgo

On Monday, February 13, 2017 I invited the world to join my MKT 200, Principles of Marketing class at American University in the Emirates via a Facebook Live broadcast.  Watching the video — which, for some reason, is unfortunately a low quality — you can get a feel for how I teach along with the way I manage my classroom and students, both engaged and disruptive.

There is even a related discussion about product design and human-computer interaction in addition to some real-world examples of my younger years playing Pong and an early version of Castle Wolfenstein with a friend!

I invite you to watch the video below via YouTube (it was originally streamed live to my Facebook page); you can also watch me lecturing about value in another marketing class via YouTube.

Primarily this class was a review for a quiz that I gave to my students two days later, but it also offers an overview of foundational marketing concepts, including the following:

  • Core Beliefs and Values: persistent and are passed on from parents to children and are reinforced by schools, churches, businesses, and government.
  • Customer Lifetime Value: the value of the entire stream of purchases that the customer would make over a lifetime of patronage.
  • Customer Relationship Management (CRM): the overall process of building and maintaining profitable customer relationships by delivering superior customer value and satisfaction.
  • Demands: Wants backed by buying power.
  • Exchange: the act of obtaining a desired object from someone by offering something in return.
  • Macroenvironment: consists of the larger societal forces that affect the microenvironment—demographic, economic, natural, technological, political, and cultural forces.
  • Market Offerings: some combination of products, services, information, or experiences offered to a market to satisfy a need or want.
  • Market Positioning: the arranging for a product to occupy a clear, distinctive, and desirable place relative to competing products in the minds of target consumers.
  • Market Segment: a group of consumers who respond in a similar way to a given set of marketing efforts.
  • Market Segmentation: the division of a market into distinct groups of buyers who have different needs, characteristics, or behaviors and who might require separate products or marketing mixes.
  • Market Targeting: the process of evaluating each market segment’s attractiveness and selecting one or more segments to enter.
  • Marketing Environment: includes the actors and forces outside marketing that affect marketing management’s ability to build and maintain successful relationships with target customers.
  • Marketing Management: The art and science of choosing target markets and building profitable relationships with them.
  • Marketing Mix: the set of tools (four Ps) the firm uses to implement its marketing strategy. This set includes product, price, promotion, and place.
  • Marketing Strategy: the marketing logic by which the company hopes to create customer value and achieve profitable customer relationships.
  • Marketing: a process by which companies create value for customers and build strong customer relationships in order to capture value from customers in return.
  • Microenvironment: consists of the actors close to the company that affect its ability to serve its customers—the company, suppliers, marketing intermediaries, customer markets, competitors, and publics.
  • Needs: States of deprivation.
  • Target Marketing: Which segments to go after.
  • Value Proposition: the set of benefits or values it promises to deliver to customers to satisfy their needs.
  • Wants: The form that needs take.

logo-gessIt is my pleasure to announce my workshop, “Professor, Brand Yourself!” was accepted for presentation on March 16 from 2:30 to 3:00 pm (exactly four months from today) at the Global Education Forum of the Global Educational Supplies and Solutions (GESS) in Dubai.

What is GESS Dubai? According to the organization’s website: “GESS Dubai is the largest education event not just in the UAE but across the entire Middle East. It’s the only event that brings together all levels of educationalists together, in one place.”

“Professor, Brand Yourself!” is a personal branding workshop for individuals working in higher education, vocational, and leadership/management positions. However, it will also appeal to anyone wanting to develop their personal brand and learn how to leverage social media to promote themselves professionally.

logo-gefIt is designed to help you understand what personal branding is, what it is not, and why personal branding is an important career development skill. You don’t need prior personal branding experience to participate in the workshop.

We will identify which social platforms are best for branding you by introducing ideas for Facebook, Instagram, LinkedIn, Twitter, and YouTube along with your blog and website.

During a “Personal Branding Brainstorming” activity you will learn how to prepare a unique selling proposition, personal motto, and professional bio which you can use as the foundation for your future personal branding efforts.

An outline of the workshop includes the following points:

  1. What is (and what is not) personal branding?
  2. Why is personal branding important for me?
  3. What social platforms are best for branding?
  4. Who am I and how should my brand reflect it?
  5. Activity: Personal Branding Brainstorming.

After the workshop you should know how to:

  1. Define personal branding and its relevance.
  2. Identify the most effective social platforms.
  3. Develop and promote your personal brand.

This will actually be my second appearance a GESS; in 2015 I gave my presentation, “Pedagogy, Socially: 7 Strategies for Curating and Creating Curriculum with Social Media” to give guidance to educators looking to leverage social media to make curriculum. Here’s a video of the presentation:

Looking forward to seeing you there!

Indicate your interest in attending this event on my Facebook page now!

Social media offers individuals an excellent environment to promote their personal brand to strengthen their professional platform. However, if engaged carelessly or irresponsibly, social media can sink you faster than the Titanic after it met the iceberg. Certainly nobody is perfect, but if you consider the 7 career-saving social media strategies below you will be more likely to swim than sink in social media.

1. Add Value to Conversations: If all you do with social media is re-tweet and share the ideas of others then it is apparent you won’t offer a potential employer original thoughts and you most likely lack motivation and initiative. In short: don’t be boring!

2. Avoid Smack Talking or Trolling: Politics, religion, and sports are topics about which people are passionate, but when you go overboard emotionally you can get yourself into trouble. Even a casual comment on an article on Facebook or a reply to a Tweet can come back to haunt you. There are countless stories of people getting fired from a job before they even start it due to a careless tweet or flippant Facebook post.

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3. Don’t Discriminate: 34% of employers in CareerBuilder’s recruitment study reacted negatively to finding social media posts with discriminatory comments related to race, religion, and gender. Another 29% of employers reacted negatively to social media posts with discriminatory comments related to race, religion, and gender. And, even if your intent was to be humorous, keep in mind that comedy doesn’t often translate online or across cultures; something you might think is funny might be offensive to others.

4. Keep Private Info Private: Unless your name is Julian Assange, you’re likely not going to make friends or influence people by disclosing sensitive or confidential information on social media. And, no matter how quickly you might try to delete it, social media remembers. You might also inadvertently share private information in public, especially on Facebook, where most people seem to misunderstand the platform’s privacy policies.

5. Post Appropriate Pictures: 46% of the employers in CareerBuilder’s annual social media recruitment study said provocative or inappropriate photographs are a big red flag. Another 40% said finding information about candidates drinking or using drugs was another reason to pass.  In short: don’t put your faults and foils on display for a future employer to find. Christopher Affsa, an attorney at the Law Office of Daniel F. Affsa in Weymouth, Massachusetts, shared the following:

“I had a drunk driving client tell me she went to one bar and only had one drink. I checked her Facebook and her profile picture was of her raising a glass. Worse, on the night in question she checked into five bars.”

6. Present a Professional Persona: Ironically, one of the biggest errors people make is to overlook the opportunity social media offers them to elevate awareness of their personal brand. According to CareerBuilder’s annual social media recruitment study:

52% of employers research applicants online. Within that group, 60% look for information supporting the candidate’s qualifications; an additional 56% want to see a candidate’s professional online persona.

7. Use Good Grammer, err — Grammar: Learn your homophones! Your and you’re mean different things as do their, they’re, and there. Conversely:

37% of employers in CareerBuilder’s recruitment study  reacted favorably when they discovered that a candidate had great communication skills; 38% were further impressed when a candidate’s social media presence conveyed a professional image.