Matthew A. Gilbert, MBA is a teacher, researcher, and trainer with more than 25 years of experience writing, speaking, and consulting. Guided by the motto “learn continuously, live generatively” he develops courses for delivery in person, via blended learning, and online. Leveraging active learning strategies, he facilitates corporate training for entrepreneurs, Fortune 500 employee, and government officials. His research interests include blockchain, entrepreneurship, internet of things (IoT), sharing economy, and social media marketing. A lifelong learner, he is studying for a PhD in Business Administration with the Bryan School of Business and Economics at the University of North Carolina, Greensboro. When asked why teaching and research are his tenure he explains, “education empowers me to influence individuals and impact organizations while improving myself in the process.”

On May 30, 2015 I published my first book, “edX E-Learning Course Development,” a 300-page manual for university teachers and corporate trainers designing, developing, and deploying a MOOC course for the edX platform

The book walks a reader through eight steps to create an edX course while teaching them about the tools and techniques they need to know as an edX instructor. The eight steps are presented in eight chapters, as follows:

  1. Getting Started: an overview of MOOCs and the history of edX.
  2. Planning the Curriculum:curriculum development.
  3. Producing Videos: video production best practices.
  4. Designing Exercises: options for exercises and assessments.
  5. Integrating the Curriculum: options for adding course materials.
  6. Administering Your Course: your course’s administrative options.
  7. Facilitating Your Course: your role as a facilitator of your edX course.
  8. Promoting Your Course:  a strategy to market your course.

Reading edX E-Learning Course Development will teach you how to:

  • Create engaging assessments and effective exercises that achieve your course’s learning objectives.
  • Establish your edX course settings, view and modify course content, and import and export your course.
  • Market your course to increase enrollment and create an enjoyable educational experience for your students.
  • Navigate edX, sign up for Studio, and create your own edX course.
  • Publish an announcement, attach a course syllabus, add instructional pages, and upload course handouts.
  • Use video production best practices and convert your classroom lectures to instructional videos.

Learn more about and purchase the book on Amazon or on the Packt Publishing website or read these related blog posts on Doctorious:

I remain grateful for the opportunity to have written this book, especially knowing that it’s helped individuals and organizations learn. One unexpected benefit for which I am also thankful: according to my Google Scholar profile, the book has been cited 16 times in various academic publications!

Here’s to learning continuously and living generatively!

For many months I have been looking for an accurate and affordable AI-powered cloud-based platform that could transcribe audio interviews and allow me to edit the transcription. I finally found that service in Otter.ai, a free voice recording app that offers automatic transcription.

More specifically, according to their “About Us” page, “Otter.ai creates technologies and products that make information from important voice conversations instantly accessible and actionable.”

How does it work? As explained by Otter.ai:

Otter turns your voice conversations into smart notes that you can easily search and share. You can use it to take notes at your meetings and interviews, capture your thoughts and ideas while you’re driving in the car, and transcribe your existing recordings and podcasts. You can even snap photos (e.g. of a whiteboard, or a speaker or presentation slide at an event) during a recording and they will be inserted inline with your transcripts. The possibilities are endless.

https://blog.otter.ai/help-center/

If you’re in need of the same services I can’t recommend this enough. The interface is intuitive and user friendly: it gives you the option to organize your interviews into folders and to create groups into which you can invite others to access your projects.

You can even connect it to your Calendar and Contacts in Google or Microsoft and link it to your Dropbox and Zoom accounts!

And, if you’re a student or teacher you can avail an Educational Discount of 50% off the regular subscription price! Click here to avail a 1-month FREE Premium Pass!

“Disability is in fact the inability to make progress and achievements. The achievements that people of determination have made in various spheres over the past years are proof that determination and strong will can do the impossible and encourage people to counter challenges and difficult circumstances while firmly achieving their goals.”

HH Sheikh Mohammed bin Rashid Al Maktoum, Vice President of the UAE and Ruler of Dubai

On Sunday, October 6, 2019 I engaged my tolerance and diversity students at the American University in the Emirates (AUE) in an exercise about disability which I adapted from an activity from my Bryan School of Business & Economics at UNCG PhD orientation program in July 2019.

In the exercise, which was designed to simulate communication and confusion within an organization, there are typically three roles (I added a fourth to facilitate the exercise in my classroom):

  1. The CEO (who can see, but not talk).
  2. The Manager (who can talk, but cannot see).
  3. The Employee (who is blindfolded).
  4. The Goalie (who holds an object that will be retrieved or interacted with; in this case, it was a service bell you would find on a desk).

The participants are situated as follows:

  • The CEO is facing the manager and the employee (who is placed at some point behind the manager).
  • The manager is directly in front of the CEO, facing him or her with their back to the employee.
  • The employee is behind the manager, blindfolded, but able to move freely in response to instructions from the manager to find it.
  • The Goalie is positioned somewhere in the room; either in a fixed location or is instructed to move at will.

Ideally, the CEO and the manager will develop a way to communicate with each other; the manager also needs to think about how to translate the CEO’s nonverbal communication to the employee. This gets especially confusing when the issue of who’s left or right comes into play. The employee is blindfolded and must listen to the voice of the manager to know where and how to move.

When I participated in this exercise as part of the orientation program for my PhD in Business Administration at the University of North Carolina at Greensboro, I was outdoors with my 17 cohort members at the university’s Piney Lake recreational area. We conducted this experiment with several teams going at the same time, creating further confusion and misunderstanding.

In my tolerance and diversity class, we conducted the exercise twice with two different sets of students (who volunteered and agreed to allow themselves to be video recorded).  Both versions are included in this video, one after the other. For the first group the Goalie did not move and remained in the same position; for the second group I instructed the Goalie to move evasively as the Employee got closer to her — thus creating further confusion and frustration.

Following the exercise, we discussed what the experience was like for those who participated (and later, for those in the class who were observing). We then bridged that exercise into a conversation about individuals with disabilities in the workplace or at our university. Students shared their experiences either as an individual with a disability or their interactions with people of determination in their personal or professional lives.

After this, I introduced an article analysis assignment of a Harvard Business Review article titled, “The Case for Improving Work for People with Disabilities Goes Way Beyond Compliance.” The assignment asked them to do three things:

  1. Summarize the main idea of the article.
  2. Identify and Paraphrase the four ways a company can create a culture of support and inclusion.
  3. Propose how you can personally create a culture of support and inclusion in your organization.

During our next class we then discussed their insights and ideas from the article while engaging in a thoughtful dialogue about the topic.

On Tuesday, September 24, 2019 I gave the first public presentation of my Dr. Seuss style poem “The Ball and The Wall: A Tale of Tolerance,” to my Tolerance and Diversity class at the American University in the Emirates (AUE).

The poem shares the story of a grandfather who, while fishing with his grandson, uses an unexpected encounter to tackle a teachable moment concerning compassion for others in addition to accepting people with different perspectives.

In invite you to watch a slightly edited version below (via YouTube) of the original Facebook Live video I broadcast while performing the poem; you can watch the original recording here.

I was first inspired to write this poem during the last meeting of my History 4C class at UC Santa Barbara in March 1996. At the conclusion of the class, the professor, Harold Marcuse, PhD, invited his teaching assistants to share any closing remarks. My teaching assistant, Kimber M. Quinney, PhD, asked us all to imagine that a large ball was floating over the lecture hall in the Isla Vista Theater (where the lectures for our class took place).

Encouraging us to accept that people have different perspectives, she explained how one side saw that the ball was red and the other side of the class saw that the ball was blue. Moving forward she asked us to accept that a perception that was not the same as our wasn’t necessarily better or worse, but that it was just different, and that was perfectly acceptable.

That last lesson stuck with me and marinated in my mind until 2003 when I wrote the first draft of what would become “The Ball and The Wall.” It has undergone edits and updates since, and will likely continue to be refined, but overall the intent and the idea are intact. It is my plan to publish this as an illustrated children’s book — for adults.

I hope you enjoy this spoken word performance and welcome any ideas it might inspire!

Time flies when you’re having fun — or at least when you’re blogging, right?

Image by profivideos from Pixabay

It was on this day in 2007 — September 19 — that I launched this blog, Doctorious, with my first post, “Welcome to Doctorious!” This anniversary is unique in that it is the first during which I finally find myself enrolled in a doctoral program that fulfills my December 2008 “PhD-Day” declaration.

Despite having a desire to pursue doctoral studies since embracing my scholarly side during my MBA program, professional concerns and personal challenges twice delayed my dreams. My personal challenges began in 2006 and have, thankfully, started to subside.

The first interruption to my doctoral education occurred in April 2007 after I completed two semesters in an EdD program in Organizational Leadership at Pepperdine University. My doctoral journey was again diverted after starting a PhD in Human and Organizational Systems at Fielding Graduate University during the fall of 2007. Interestingly, this blog was launched during my New Student Orientation at Fielding.

Despite my many challenges, I never lost sight of my dream to earn a doctorate; it has always been the one goal that keeps me focused and positive — even during the darkest of days. My circumstances led me to explore the expat option which has been my life since 2014.

Living and teaching in Dubai provided me with the readiness, resolve, and resources to earn my doctorate. In Dubai I was further fortunate to find my fiancée, Sylvia, in Dubai; her support and sensibility is the foundation of my faith and fortitude. Living and teaching in Dubai provided me with the readiness, resilience, resolve, and resources to earn my doctorate.

Notably, it was through my affiliation with the American University in the Emirates that I learned about the PhD in Business Administration offered by the Bryan School of Business and Economics at the University of North Carolina at Greensboro in which I am now enrolled. I have long searched for a PhD that was credible, affordable, and flexible — and this program is perfect in every way!

Designed to prepare students for an academic career at a major college or university, this 60-hour, research-focused, cohort-based program provides a broad overview of all areas of business, while also customizing their area of focus on strategy, international business, or organizational behavior. Impressively, this is the first — and only — AACSB-accredited online PhD Program in Business Administration.

I plan to conduct my research under the guidance of the expert faculty at UNC Greensboro to ascertain the significance of education in preparing entrepreneurs to conquer challenges that they will face in the future and to design strategies that enable them to do so. While most existing literature seeks to understand how and why entrepreneurs innovate, it has often neglected the role of education and the significance of the environment in which entrepreneurs operate.

In the long-term, the economic growth of a region depends largely on whether the students of today are properly prepared to develop innovative solutions for the future. It inspires me to consider that my doctoral research might contribute to the success of UAE’s efforts to establish itself as a hub of innovation, not just in the region, but worldwide.

Langston Hughes, in his powerful poem, “Harlem,” asks “what happens to a dream deferred?” Fortunately, my determination during the previous decade resulted in a reversal of fortune; I am now finally ready to resume – and, more importantly complete – my doctoral journey.

Previous posts celebrating an anniversary of this blog include:

Based on TEDTalks from the world’s most remarkable minds, the TED Radio Hour is a podcast co-produced by NPR and TED that take listeners on a journey through fascinating ideas, astonishing inventions, and new ways to think and create. TEDTalks Based on TEDTalks from the world’s most remarkable minds, the TED Radio Hour is a podcast co-produced by NPR and TED that take listeners on a journey through fascinating ideas, astonishing inventions, and new ways to think and create.

The TED Radio Hour  was created and is hosted by editorial director Guy Raz, who is similarly involved two other popular NPR programs: How I Built This and Wow In The World. The show is fastest-growing NPR radio program in history and the third most-downloaded podcast in the United States. Common questions asked (and answered) include “Why do we have the capacity to imagine?” “What animates us?” “What does it mean to live in the Anthropocene?”

In this episode, Press Play, TED speakers describe how forms of amusement — from tossing a ball to video games — can make us smarter, saner and more collaborative. It was originally broadcast on March 27, 2015.

Guests include:

  • Neuroscientist Jeff Mogil who reveals how playing a game can make you more empathetic.
  • Comedian Charlie Todd who explains how his group, Improv Everywhere, creates moments of urban whimsy to bring people together.
  • Dr. Stuart Brown, the founder of the National Institute for Play in California, who says humor, games, roughhousing, and fantasy are more than just fun.
  • Primatologist Isabel Behncke Izquierdo who explains how bonobos learn by constantly playing, and how that play can offer insights into human laughter, creativity and our capacity for wonder and exploration.
  • Researcher Jane McGonigal, a researcher of games and Director of Games Research & Development at the Institute for the Future, who says virtual games can improve our real lives.

I am proud to announce that I have been selected by Education Influence as one of the education influencers in the United Arab Emirates.  I join the ranks of one hundred other professionals around the world in a virtual collaborative community of practice. If you are you a parent, teacher or school in UAE needing guidance on education, I am in an ideal position to be of service to you.

Founded by Gavin McCormack, principal at Farmhouse Montessori School, Education Influence is a non-profit community of practice that connects teachers from all walks of life to resources, courses, and each other to bring about educational change on a global scale. The organization acknowledges those who are making innovations in the classroom and beyond to provide a network of highly accomplished teachers who can pave the way for others.

Each country has a highly skilled representative willing to go that extra mile to bring high quality education to those who need it. All influencers have access to a huge database of resources for teachers and schools. Educators need help, assistance, and resources; we want them to get answers. Equality in education for everyone is the greatest gift we can offer the future of the world; together we can make this dream a reality. If you need help or you know someone who does, please contact your nearest influencer.

The organization just launched a robust website to provide teachers, schools and parents a place to find support and help. As teachers we are all striving for the best foundations for the children in our care, but do we all have the resources to make this happen? We do now! Many months were spent building the site so that others can find assistance easily. When you visit the website, you can:

There is a revolution happening in the field of education and Education Influence is here to help make positive change happen. The organization unites teachers, schools and parents from all corners of the earth to find resources, advice and support as they strive for equality in education.

I invite you to join us on this journey and encourage you to visit EducationInfluence.com for free teaching information, advice, and resources!

I am honored to announce that I have joined the Journal of Management and Training for Industries (JMTI), a peer-reviewed free-access online journal published by the Institute of Industrial Applications Engineers, as an editorial board member and paper reviewer.

The journal is published under the direction of Dr. Rong Zhang, a Professor at the Nishinippon Institute of Technology.  It aims to provide academic professionals, researchers, policy-makers and practitioners a forum to discuss issues and newly emerging trends in the field of management and training for industries from a multi-disciplinary perspective. 

Original research papers, book reviews, and research notes covering a wide range of topics related to management and training are welcomed. We offer a complete or partial publication fee waiver to authors of high quality articles. JMTI is currently indexed by the following databases:

  • ProQuest
  • EBSCO
  • Ulrich’s Periodicals Directory
  • CiNii (Citation Information by National Institute of Informatics, Japan)
  • NSD-Norwegian Center for Research Data
  • WorldCat (OCLC)
  • Summon
  • JournalTOCs
  • Primo
  • Informit
  • Ingenta

To learn more about submitting your manuscript for publication,  please visit https://www2.ia-engineers.org/JMTI/index.php/jmti/about/submissions.

“Hey, hey, hey, hey-now. Don’t be mean; we don’t have to be mean, cuz, remember, no matter where you go, there you are.” — The Adventures of Buckaroo Banzai Across the 8th Dimension

Four years ago today — on September 8, 2014 — I stepped off a United Airlines 777 at Dubai International Airport (DXB) and took the first step on my journey as an expat in the United Arab Emirates. The 1,461 days since have been filled with exponential personal development as I have continuously challenged myself to be a better version of me. Not every lesson has been successful; some took several tries to get right and others are still a work in progress.

Nevertheless, I am progressing personally and learning to reframe a challenging situation. This doesn’t mean that I don’t have plans to improve my present state, but it means I work towards achieving them while embracing the “art of possibility.”

Being in Dubai has also allowed me to develop professionally in ways that would not have been possible in the United States. After teaching marketing and management classes for the past three years in the College of Business Administration at the American University in the Emirates, the start of this academic year marks my shift into the College of Education. I will now teach five sections of the following three courses:

  • HAP 200, Happiness Studies
  • INV 300,  Innovation and Entrepreneurship
  • TOL 200, Tolerance and Diversity

In related news, the United Arab Emirates Ministry of Education selected me as one of 30 educators from a pool of more than 400 applicants to join “Cohort 3” of the “UAE Innovation and Entrepreneurship Program.” The program provides curriculum, programs, and networks to equip the next generation of UAE leaders with an innovation and entrepreneurship mindset to ensure the country’s ongoing economic achievement (this is directly linked to the INV 300,  Innovation and Entrepreneurship course I am now teaching).  It also included an educational visit to Stanford University this past July 10 to 13, 2018 for specialized training in design thinking, the conceptual foundation of the initiative.

Unfortunately, while being overseas opens opportunities that were not possible for me in the United States, it minimizes the time I can spend with my two amazing sons, Jacob and Max. Despite being far from my sons physically, they are always close to my heart. It is my sincere hope that one day I can make amends for my physical absence in their lives. For now, I make enthusiastic efforts to participate in their lives virtually while maximizing the moments we can share physically.

Overall, I remain grateful for my expat experiences in Dubai. I also look forward to the future with optimism and excitement, despite not being fully clear about what it has in store for me.

If you want to learn more about my expat adventure, I suggest the following posts: